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Ready & Successful Professionals 2017

Ready & Successful Professionals 2017

Index and Glossary

Ready & Successful | Professionals

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Children under 6 with all parents in the workforce 1 61.8%^ 68.3%^ 60.3%v 59.6%^ 59.8%^ 59.5%v
Number of spaces for 3 & 4 yr olds in state & Federally funded preschool (ECEAP & Head Start) 2 192^ 40v 535v 1556v 351v 21,186v
Number of licensed child care and education programs – centers and family homes. 3 41 6v 95^ 480v 87v 5057v
Number of spaces for children in licensed child care and educational programs – centers and family homes 4 1,168^ 193v 2,261^ 14,412^ 2,505^ 146,628^
Percent of licensed child care providers enrolled in Early Achievers 5 71%^ 100% 88%^ 62%^ 75%^ 71%^
Number of Regional Transition Reports shared between preschool and kindergarten teachers 6 187^ 72^ 300^ 635v 423^ N/A
Benefits to play-based learning & environments

Growth of KP&L Accross the Region

For more information about the Kaleidoscope Play & Learn program or to download the NW Play & Learn booklet, go to www.nwesd.org/northwest-play-learn.

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children, www.naeyc.org Source:Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017

1 Source: The U.S. Census Bureau's American Fact Finder, American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates 2015 date. Note: The percent of children under 6 years old with all parents in the workforce.

2 Source: Washington State Department of Early Learning, Early Learning Management System (ELMS) Note: Head Start and the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) are comprehensive education, health, and family support programs free of charge to eligible children and families. ECEAP & Head Start serve children 3-5 years-old. Early Head Start serves children birth-3 years-old. Head Start is federally-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level. ECEAP is state-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 110 percent of the federal poverty level.

3 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, 2016 Annual report. Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

4 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, 2016 Annual report. Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

5 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2016 Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

6 Source: PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017 Note: The Regional PreK-K Transition Report is a transitional document that shared between community PreK providers and kindergarten teachers, which represents a growing collaboration based on common professional development, shared expectations and aligned instructional approaches. The Transition Form is intended to maintain common understandings and shared practices (alignment) between PreK providers and K teachers established through joint professional development, to provide a means of communicating children’s developmental progress as they leave PreK and enter kindergarten, to help schools meet the needs of incoming students and to grow the number of PreK and K teachers working in collaboration.