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2017 State of Children & Families Report

2017 State of Children & Families Report

Northwest Early Learning has adopted this framework as a roadmap for building a comprehensive, coordinated, and effective early learning system across our five counties. More information about the Early Learning Plan online.

Red balloons in the report are used to indicate special community efforts to build and sustain safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments.

Up & down arrows ( ↑ ↓ ) in the data tables indicate the data value has increased or decreased over the previous year. No arrow indicates no change, a new data indicator to the report, that the data is calculated differently from last year.

Sources: Data included in the report were collected from both primary and secondary sources based on the best data available at the time of development. We rely on early learning professionals to provide information about the children and families they serve. We also refer to state data sources throughout.

2017 State of Children & Families Report(pdf)

Ready & Successful Framework

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Number of children under age 5 0 5,301^ 459v 7,286^ 47,640^ 11,467^ 439,657v
Children under 6 living in extreme poverty 1 6.7%^ 17%^ 10.2%^ 8.1%^ 9.2%^ 8.8%~
Children served by Children’s Administration (CPS, Child Welfare, Family Reconciliation) 2 1,062^ 119v 2187^ 10,666^ 3437^ 112,082^
Number foster care placements, ages 0-17 3 726 <10 137^ 752^ 319^ 9,336^
Children with developmental delays, ages 0-3, served by early intervention 4 177^ 14^ 197^ 1,867^ 469^ 16,137^
Kindergartners meeting or exceeding standards by area of development at fall 2016:
   Social-Emotional standards 5 65.6%v 63.8%v 67.9%v 68.4%v 69.5%v 70.2%v
   Physical standards 6 83.7%v 83%v 81.2%v 80.7%v 85%^ 78.8%^
   Language standards 7 83.2%v 85.8%v 81.4%^ 84.4%^ 85.4%v 81.2%^
   Cognitive standards 8 79.8%v 85.7%v 75%^ 78.1%^ 82.5%v 76.7%
   Literacy standards 9 88.9%v 88.5%^ 75%^ 82.9%^ 86.1%v 82.6^
   Math standards 10 72.9%^ 88.5%^ 54.5%^ 69.7%^ 65.5%v 66%^
8th graders with depressive symptoms 11 24.%v 29%^ 30% 27%v 26%v 28%^
On-time graduation rate, public schools 12 88.9%^ 81.6%^ 78.2%^ 84.1%^ 78.7%v 79.1%^
All 6 Areas ReadySocial Emotional Readiness by County
Source:OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.

0Source: 2016 from the Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM), Estimates of April 1 Population, Small Area Demographic Estimates (SADE).

1 Source: 2010-2014 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year Estimates; Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder. Note: The number and share of children under age 6 who live in families with incomes less than 50 percent of the federal poverty level, as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

2 Source: DSHS, 2015 Services and Administrative Support Administration; Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. Note: Percent of children under 18 years of age served by Children’s Administration. Children’s Administration services are provided to children and their families and include Adoption and Adoption Support, Child Protective Services (CPS), Child and Family Welfare Services, Family Reconciliation Services (FRS), and Family Voluntary Services.

3 Source: DSHS, 2015 Services and Enterprise Support Administration; Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. Note: According to DSHS, “Foster Care Placement Services are provided when children need short-term or temporary protection because they are abused, neglected, and/or involved in family conflict. The goal of Foster Care Placement Services is to return children to their homes or to find another permanent home as early as possible. Children are served in out-of-home placements exclusively. Placement types include traditional Foster Care Placement Services as well as placements in Family Receiving Homes. Client counts for Foster Care Placement Services include only the children being served, not their families. Children receiving Foster Care Placement Services are served exclusively in out-of-home settings. Foster Care Placement Services may be provided without prior Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement.”

4 Source: July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 Early Services for Infants & Toddler; Department of Early Learning cumulative retrieved from the Early Support for Infants and Toddlers Data Management System. Note: An Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) is a plan for special services for children between the ages of birth through age three with developmental delays. Children transition to an Individualized Education Program (IEP) at age three.

5 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

6 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

7 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

8 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

9 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

10 Source: OSPI, 2016-17 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card. Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

11 Source: 2016 Washington Healthy Youth Survey results generated at AskHYS.net Note: Depressive Symptoms: Feeling sad, hopeless or helpless to such an extent it effects your daily activities every day for two or more weeks at some point in the past year.

12 Source: 2017, Graduation Analytics, OSPI

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Households with children under  age of 6 1 1,948 270 2,417 20,154 4,579 183,273
Estimated Basic Annual cost of living for family with 2 adults, 1 preschooler, 1 infant 2 $56,088 $57,864 $56,604 $61,428 $57,672 $52,152
Unemployment rate 3 5.0%v 3.7%v 5.2%v 3.5%v 4.7%v 4.5%v
Homeless individuals living in family units 4 181 96 353 1066 734 21,845
Children participating in the Basic Food Program 5 20%v 19%v 37%v 22%v 28%v 30%v
Percent of births that qualified for Medicaid assistance 6 28.6%v 58.8%^ 63.1%^ 40.7%^ 52.1%^ 49.2%^
Mothers receiving prenatal care in the first trimester 7 74.6%^ 71.1%^ 68.6%^ 73%^ 67.3%v 73.7%^
Families served by Women Infants & Children (WIC), supplemental nutrition 8 2,969^ 324v 6,200^ 21,404v 7,277^ 293,914^
Number of spaces available in Early Head Start, including migrant and tribal 9 27 0 70 214 113 3,275
Teen birth rate (15-17 years) per 100010 6.8 <5 9.6 6.5 5.3 8.3
Teen pregnancy (15-19 years)11 54 4 115 507 161 6,035
Positive Outcomes KP&L Positive Outcomes Play & Learn
Source: “Summary of Year-End Kaleidoscope Play & Learn Participant Survey Results, December 2016.  For more information about the Kaleidoscope Play & Learn program or to download the NW Play & Learn booklet, go to www.nwesd.org/northwest-play-learn Source: Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017.

Anchor1 Source: U.S. Census Bureau Note: **San Juan data taken from U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey

Anchor2 Source: 2013 United Way ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report data

Anchor3 Source: May 2017, Washington State Employment Security Department  Note: Persons aged 16 years and older had no employment during the reference week, were available for work, except for temporary illness, and had made specific efforts to find employment sometime during the 4-week period ending with the reference week. Persons who were waiting to be recalled to job from which they had been laid off need not have been looking for work to be classified as unemployed.

Anchor4 Source: January 2017, Washington State Point in Time of Homeless Persons Note: Point-in-Time Count as a “count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons carried out on one night in the last 10 calendar days of January or at such other time as required by Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
For the point in time count, persons living in emergency shelters (including motel/hotel vouchers), transitional housing, or unsheltered (in places not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandoned buildings, on the street) are counted. Persons living in a dwelling lacking any of the following should be considered homeless: drinking water, restroom, heat, ability to cook hot food, or ability to bathe. Persons living temporarily with family or friends due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason (often referred to as “doubled-up” or “couch surfing”) do not meet the HUD definition of homeless. There is no requirement to count these individuals; however this data is useful in identifying the need for housing and services.

Anchor5 Source: 2016 Client counts come from the Washington state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Research and Data Analysis, Client Services Database which compiles client service and expenditures records from more than 20 of the agency’s client record and payment systems. The figures reported here are also referred to as “User rates” in their annual report. Data were retrieved on July 3, 2017 from https://www.dshs.wa.gov/sesa/research-and-data-analysis/client-data.  Definitions: Number and percent of children under age 18 who are served by the Basic Food Program.  Note: that even though the number of under 18 children served represents income-eligible children, the percent figures do not represent percent of all income-eligible children served. Instead, the percent figures represent percent of all under 18 children in the area, regardless of income level. Therefore, in percentage calculation, the numerator is number of under 18 children served while the denominator is total under 18 child population.

Anchor6 Source: 2015 State of Washington – First Steps Database: Eligibility status for Washington women with Medicaid-paid births in 2015Note: Eligibility for Medicaid is based on family income and citizenship status, and was obtained from eligibility history at the time of birth. S-Women numbers do not include undocumented women. Some women who received Medicaid services were eligible through programs other than those specified above, or did not have a Medicaid eligibility history record. Percentages (%) refer to the percent of total women giving birth. As of 2014, records do not include out-of-state deliveries to Washington residents because birth certificates for states other than Washington were not available for record linkage.

Anchor7 Source: 2016 Washington State Health Care Authority

Anchor8 Source: FFY 2016, Washington State Department of Health

Anchor9 Source: Washington State Department of Early Leanring Managment System (ELMS) Notes: Head Start and the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) are comprehensive education, health, and family support programs free of charge to eligible children and families. ECEAP & Head Start serve children 3-5 years-old. Early Head Start serves children birth-3 years-old. Head Start is federally-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level. ECEAP is state-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 110 percent of the federal poverty level.

Anchor10Source: 2014 Teen birth rate (15-17): Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center  Note: Births to teenagers ages 15-17. Rate is per 1,000 females in this age group. This measure of teenage child bearing focuses on the fertility of all females ages 15 to 17. The age range for teen birth rate was change from 15-19 to 15-17 this year.

Anchor11Source: 2014 Teen pregnancy: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center  Note: Teenagers 15 through 19 years of age who were pregnant, regardless of material status. Pregnancy outcomes could be live births, abortions, or fetal deaths. Therefore, total pregnancy equals the sum of live births, abortions, and fetal deaths. Rates represent the number of pregnancies to 15-19 year old women per 1,000 women of this age group.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Children under 6 with all parents in the workforce 1 61.8%^ 68.3%^ 60.3%v 59.6%^ 59.8%^ 59.5%v
Number of spaces for 3 & 4 yr olds in state & Federally funded preschool (ECEAP & Head Start) 2 192^ 40v 535v 1556v 351v 21,186v
Number of licensed child care and education programs – centers and family homes. 3 41 6v 95^ 480v 87v 5057v
Number of spaces for children in licensed child care and educational programs – centers and family homes  4 1,168^ 193v 2,261^ 14,412^ 2,505^ 146,628^
Percent of licensed child care providers enrolled in Early Achievers 5 71%^ 100% 88%^ 62%^ 75%^ 71%^
Number of Regional Transition Reports shared between preschool and kindergarten teachers 6 187^ 72^ 300^ 635v 423^ N/A
Benefits to play-based learning & environments Growth of KP&L Accross the Region

For more information about the Kaleidoscope Play & Learn program or to download the NW Play & Learn booklet, go to www.nwesd.org/northwest-play-learn.

Source:  National Association for the Education of Young Children, www.naeyc.org Source: Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017

AnchorSource: The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder, American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates 2015 date. Note: The percent of children under 6 years old with all parents in the workforce.

AnchorSource: Washington State Department of Early Learning, Early Learning Management System (ELMS) Note: Head Start and the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) are comprehensive education, health, and family support programs free of charge to eligible children and families. ECEAP & Head Start serve children 3-5 years-old. Early Head Start serves children birth-3 years-old. Head Start is federally-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level. ECEAP is state-funded, with at least 90 percent of enrolled families at or below 110 percent of the federal poverty level.

AnchorSource: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, 2016 Annual report. Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

AnchorSource: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, 2016 Annual report.  Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

AnchorSource: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2016  Note: Licensed Child Care and Education Centers and Family Homes receive this designation through the WA State Department of Early Learning. Licensed child care programs follow Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirements to ensure children in are in safe, nurturing and appropriate care/education settings. County numbers do include Military Child Care Centers, licensed/certified Military and Tribal Center and Family off base programs.

AnchorSource: PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017 Note: The Regional PreK-K Transition Report is a transitional document that shared between community PreK providers and kindergarten teachers, which represents a growing collaboration based on common professional development, shared expectations and aligned instructional approaches. The Transition Form is intended to maintain common understandings and shared practices (alignment) between PreK providers and K teachers established through joint professional development, to provide a means of communicating children’s developmental progress as they leave PreK and enter kindergarten, to help schools meet the needs of incoming students and to grow the number of PreK and K teachers working in collaboration.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
 K-12 enrollment, public schools 1 8,171v 1,875v 18,951v 109,968^ 27,223v 1,089,066v
Kindergarten enrollement, public schools 2 657^ 135^ 1,432^ 7,989^ 2,024^ 81,099^
Free & Reduced Lunch Enrollment 3 35% 33.9%v 51% 37% 40.3%^ 44%
Percent of students that are Transitional Bilingual – English Language Learners 4 2.8%^ 5% 14.6%v 10.8%^ 6.8%v 11%
Percent of incoming kindergarteners READY in all 6 areas of development, fall 2016  5 48.9%^ 62.1%^ 41.6%^ 46.5%^ 50.5%^ 47.4%^
Percent of incoming kindergarteners NOT ready in any area of development, fall 2016 6 4.4%^ 7.7%^ 5.7%v 3.8% 2.9%^ 5.3%v
Percent of children w/ IEPs who were functioning within age expectations at the end of perschool 7 59.4%^ 57.4%v 51.9%^ 59.4%v 61.8%v 53.6%v
Students from low-income households who graduated high school in four years 8 84.3%^ 76.6%^ 69%^ 74.2%^ 67.6%^ 69.4%v
Districts in the region that accepted PreK-K Transition Reports out of total number of districts  9 3/3 3/4 5/7 12/14 7/7
Source: Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017.  For more information about the Kaleidoscope Play & Learn program or to download the NW Play & Learn booklet, go to www.nwesd.org/northwest-play-learn.
Source: Northwest Educational Service District, July 2017.

AnchorSource: OSPI, Oct 2016; County Level

AnchorSource: OSPI, Oct 2016 count

AnchorSource: OSPI, Oct 2016 count Notes: The number and percent of students enrolled in public K-12 schools who applied for free or reduced price meals at their school. Data reflect only those enrolled students who applied as of October 1 of each year. These includes the number of students who applied and were eligible for free or reduced priced meals. These numbers do not necessarily reflect use of the service. The federal income eligibility guidelines are 135% FPL (poverty guide) for free school meals, and 185% FPL for reduced price school meals. Click here for the Guidelines

AnchorSource: OSPI, May 2016 count Notes: A student is considered eligible for the Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program if they meet the following two conditions: 1) the language used most often used by student in his/her place of residence (not necessarily by parents, guardians, or others) or the first language that the student learned, and 2) English skills are sufficiently lacking or absent as to delay learning.

AnchorSource: OSPI, Oct 2016 Notes: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

AnchorSource: OSPI, Oct 2016 Notes: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

AnchorSource: OSPI, Data included in the FFY 2015 APR Notes: Average of: % of preschool children with IEPs who demonstrate improved S/E skills + % of preschool children with IEPs who demonstrate improved knowledge & skills + % of preschool children with IEPs who demonstrate improved use of appropriate behaviors to meet needs.

AnchorSource: OSPI, State Report Card Notes: These are the percentage of the low income students who graduated in four years (a subset of the whole graduating class).

AnchorSource: PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District 189, July 2017 Notes: The Regional PreK-K Transition Report is a transitional document that shared between community PreK providers and kindergarten teachers, which represents a growing collaboration based on common professional development, shared expectations and aligned instructional approaches. The Transition Form is intended to maintain common understandings and shared practices (alignment) between PreK providers and K teachers established through joint professional development, to provide a means of communicating children’s developmental progress as they leave PreK and enter kindergarten, to help schools meet the needs of incoming students and to grow the number of PreK and K teachers working in collaboration.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
 Working poor (ALICE: Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed + Federal poverty level) 1 32% 32% 36% 33% 41% 32%
Combined households below US poverty and those that earn over poverty level but less than basic cost of living:
Asian households 2 37% 37% 47% 31% 47% N/A
Black households  3 48% 17% 31% 45% 67% N/A
Hispanic households 4 37% 57% 57% 47% 55% N/A
White households 5 31% 31% 33% 32% 39% N/A
Number of partner organizations affiliated with Northwest Early Learning 6 32 23 34 34 30 10
Participants at PreK-K Collaborative Network Dinner & Dialogues, Spring 2017  7 55v 41v Coming Fall 2017 99^ 97^ N/A
Number of Regional Transition Reports shared between preschool and kindergarten teachers in public schools 8 187^ 72^ 300^ 635v 423^ N/A
Protective & Risk Factors

Source: Communities can mitigate and even eliminate unnecessary adversity and increase health and well-being by engaging growth of protective factors.
(Comprehensive Health Education Foundation)
Homeless Individuals Living as Family Units

 *Homeless persons reporting as individuals living as family units.
Source: The homeless data is from:
Annual homeless count, January 26, 2017 compiled by WA State Department of Commerce, Housing Assistance Unit.

AnchorSource: United Way ALICE (Assett Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report 2015

AnchorSource: United Way ALICE (Assett Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report 2015

AnchorSource: United Way ALICE (Assett Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report 2015

AnchorSource: United Way ALICE (Assett Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report 2015

AnchorSource: United Way ALICE (Assett Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report 2015

AnchorSource: Northwest Educational Service District 189, June 2017. Northwest Early Learning annually gathers membership information from the county coalitions about early learning partner organizations. This data is submitted to and analyzed by NWEL to create a network mapping of all the partners that constitute our regional coalition.

AnchorSource: PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District, 2016-2017

AnchorSource: PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District, 2016-2017