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2016 Report Sources and Index

2016 Report Sources and Index

State of Children and FamiliesThe State of Children and Families report is published annually, to advocate for young children and their families. The report provides demographic and programmatic data to illustrate key components of our local early learning systems and to highlight priority actions that NWEL is taking.

You can view the source index and glossary for each section of the report by clicking on the links below. If you would like a copy of the 2016 State of Children and Families report, you may contact Anita Garcia.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Children under 6 living in extreme poverty 1 6.7%^ 17%^ 10.2%^ 8.1%^ 9.2%^ 8.8%~
Children served by Children’s Administration (CPS, Child Welfare, Family Reconciliation) 2 1,003 125 2,146 10,335 3,440 109,363
Number foster care placements, ages 0-17 3 66v <10 123v 731v 329v 9154^
Children with developmental delays, ages 0-3, served by early intervention 4 169 6 180 1,714 413 14,985
Kindergartners meeting or exceeding standards by area of development at Fall 2015:
   Social-Emotional standards 5 81.2%~ 74.5%v 70.1%v 73.8%v 80.4%v 73.2%v
   Physicalstandards 6 90.3%^ 87.8%v 82.8%v 81.3%v 83.7%v 77.3%v
   Languagestandards 7 90.5%v 88.8%v 76.3%v 82.5%v 85.9%v 78.9%v
   Cognitivestandards 8 86.4%^ 88.8%v 68.5%v 76.2% 84% 74.6%^
   Literacystandards 9 90%v 87.8%v 72.2%v 81.8%v 88.7% 80.9%^
   Mathstandards 10 70.6%v 74.5%v 51.5%v 64.7%v 70.3%v 60.8%v
8th graders with depressive symptoms 11 29% 24% 30% 28% 28% 26%
On-time graduation rate, public schools 12 81.8% 75.2%v 71.9%^ 77.8% 79%^ 78.1%^

Percent of Dependency Cases Involving Children Age 5 and Under

Children Under 5

Source: 2015, Entries to Dependency Care, Washington State Administrative Office of the Courts  Note: Dependency Cases are filed when there may be abuse or neglect of children in the home.
Source: 2015 from the Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM), Estimates of April 1 Population, Small Area Demographic Estimates (SADE). Data were provided by OFM on May 6, 2016.

Children Under Age 5

Prenatal Care

1 Source: 2010-2014 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year Estimates;  Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder.  Note: The number and share of children under age 6 who live in families with incomes less than 50 percent of the federal poverty level, as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

2 Source: DSHS, 2014 Services and Enterprise Support Administration; Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. Note: Percent of children under 18 years of age served by Children’s Administration. Children’s Administration services are provided to children and their families and include Adoption and Adoption Support, Child Protective Services (CPS), Child and Family Welfare Services, Family Reconciliation Services (FRS), and Family Voluntary Services.

3 Source: DSHS, 2014 Services and Enterprise Support Administration; Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. Note: According to DSHS, “Foster Care Placement Services are provided when children need short-term or temporary protection because they are abused, neglected, and/or involved in family conflict. The goal of Foster Care Placement Services is to return children to their homes or to find another permanent home as early as possible. Children are served in out-of-home placements exclusively. Placement types include traditional Foster Care Placement Services as well as placements in Family Receiving Homes. Client counts for Foster Care Placement Services include only the children being served, not their families. Children receiving Foster Care Placement Services are served exclusively in out-of-home settings. Foster Care Placement Services may be provided without prior Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement.”

4Source: July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016 Early Services for Infants & Toddler; Department of Early Learning cumulative retrieved from the Early Support for Infants and Toddlers Data Management System. Note: An Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) is a plan for special services for children between the ages of birth through age three with developmental delays. Children transition to an Individualized Education Program (IEP) at age three.

5 Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

6Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

7Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

8Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

9 Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

10 Source: OSPI, 2015-16 WaKIDS, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Report Card.  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.

11Source: 2014 Washington Healthy Youth Survey results generated at AskHYS.net  Note:Depressive Symptoms: Feeling sad, hopeless or helpless to such an extent it effects your daily activities every day for two or more weeks at some point in the past year.

12Source: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: 2013-2014 data for this measure come from the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI). Data were retrieved on April 23, 2015 from “Graduation and Drop out Statistics” reports, and Appendices A and B at this link.  Note: A student graduates on-time if he/she receives a high school diploma within four years of starting 9th grade. Total graduation rate is the percentage of all students who graduated from high school within four years after they started 9th grade. The numerator is all high school students who graduated with a high school diploma within four years of starting 9th grade. The denominator is the total cohort size who started 9th grade four years prior to graduation.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Households with children under  age of 6 1 1,898 315** 2,592 20,670 4,438 187,953
Annual cost of living for family with 2 adults, 1 preschooler, 1 infant 2 $56,088 $57,864 $56,604 $61,428 $57,672 $52,152
Unemployment rate 3 6.4%v 4.5%v 6.8%v 4.8%v 6.4%v 5.7%v
Homeless families 4 126^ 74^ 351^ 829v 652^ 19,418
Children participating in the Basic Food Program 5 23%v 25%v 43%v 26%v 31%v 34%v
Percent of births that qualified for Medicaid assistance 6 35.2% 55.6 61.5% 40.6% 50.3% 48.8%
Mothers receiving prenatal care in the first trimester 7 74.1%v 64.4%v 63.5%v 67.2% 67.4%v 68.3%v
Families served by Women Infants & Children (WIC), supplemental nutrition 8 2,912v 360v 6,112v 21,612v 7,158v 289,945v
Number of spaces available in Early Head Start, including migrant and tribal 9 27 0 66 40 113^ 2,770
Teen birth rate (15-17 years) per 100010 6.8 per 1000 <5 per 1000 9.6 per 1000 6.5 per 1000 5.3 per 1000 8.3 per 1000
Teen pregnancy (15-19 years)11 54v 4 115v 507v 161v 6,035

Struggling Households

FlourishingFamilies

Source: 2013 United Way ALICE Report  Note:ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.
Source: 2013 United Way ALICE Report  Note:ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

Minimum Child Care

Minimum_Child_Care

Minimum Housing

Source: 2013 United Way ALICE Report  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

1Source: U.S. Census Bureau Note: **San Juan data taken from U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey

2Source: 2013 United Way ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report data

3Source: July 2016, Washington State Employment Security Department  Note: Persons aged 16 years and older had no employment during the reference week, were available for work, except for temporary illness, and had made specific efforts to find employment sometime during the 4-week period ending with the reference week. Persons who were waiting to be recalled to job from which they had been laid off need not have been looking for work to be classified as unemployed.

4Source: 2015 Washington State Department of Commerce Point in Time and Housing Inventory Count of Homeless Persons  Note: Point-in-Time Count as a “count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons carried out on one night in the last 10 calendar days of January or at such other time as required by Housing and Urban Development (HUD). For the point in time count. persons living in emergency shelters (including motel/hotel vouchers), transitional housing, or unsheltered (in places not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, abandoned buildings, on the street) are counted. Persons living in a dwelling lacking any of the following should be considered homeless” drinking water, restroom, heat, ability to cook hot food, or ability to bathe. Persons living temporarily with family or friends due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason (often referred to as “doubled-up” or “couch surfing”) do not meet the HUD definition of homeless. There is no requirement to count these individuals; however this data is useful in identifying the need for housing and services.

5Source: 2014 Client counts come from the Washington state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Research and Data Analysis, Client Services Database which compiles client service and expenditures records from more than 20 of the agency’s client record and payment systems. The figures reported here are also referred to as “User rates” in their annual report. Data were retrieved on June 22, 2016 from https://www.dshs.wa.gov/sesa/research-and-data-analysis/client-data. ALSO page 4 of this data: https://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/ESA/briefing-manual/2015Basic_Food_Assistance.pdf  Note: Number and percent of children under age 18 who are served by the Basic Food Program.  Note that even though the number of under 18 children served represents income-eligible children, the percent figures do not represent percent of all income-eligible children served. Instead, the percent figures represent percent of all under 18 children in the area, regardless of income level. Therefore, in percentage calculation, the numerator is number of under 18 children served while the denominator is total under 18 child population.

6Source: 2014 State of Washington – First Steps Database: Eligibility status for Washington women with Medicaid-paid births in 2014. Note: Eligibility for Medicaid is based on family income and citizenship status, and was obtained from eligibility history at the time of birth. S-Women numbers do not include undocumented women. Some women who received Medicaid services were eligible through programs other than those specified above, or did not have a Medicaid eligibility history record. Percentages (%) refer to the percent of total women giving birth. As of 2014, records do not include out-of-state deliveries to Washington residents because birth certificates for states other than Washington were not available for record linkage.

7Source: 2014 Washington State Health Care Authority

8Source: FFY 2015, Washington State Department of Health

9Source:

10Source: 2014 Teen birth rate (15-17): Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center  Note: Births to teenagers ages 15-17. Rate is per 1,000 females in this age group. This measure of teenage child bearing focuses on the fertility of all females ages 15 to 17. The age range for teen birth rate was change from 15-19 to 15-17 this year.

11Source: 2014 Teen pregnancy: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center  Note: Teenagers 15 through 19 years of age who were pregnant, regardless of material status. Pregnancy outcomes could be live births, abortions, or fetal deaths. Therefore, total pregnancy equals the sum of live births, abortions, and fetal deaths. Rates represent the number of pregnancies to 15-19 year old women per 1,000 women of this age group.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
Children under 6 with all parents in the workforce 1 60.8% not available 55.7% 58.7% 57.7% 59.5%
Number of spaces for children in state-funded preschool (ECEAP) 2 108 38 90 1,137 143 10,091
Number of spaces in federal-funded preschool (Head Start), including migrant and tribal. 3 58 15 494 546 596 13,998
Licensed child care providers/programs  4 41 7 102 521 98 5,272
Number of spaces available for children in licensed child care (family homes & centers) 5 858 205 2,205 13,665 2,464 141,439
Number of spaces available for infant care in licensed child care (family homes & centers) 6 94 8 272 1,490 286 16,124
% of licensed child care providers enrolled in Early Achievers  7 41% 71% 49% 33% 63% 46%
Number of Regional Transition Reports shared between preschool and kindergarten teachers 8 174 25 283 641 322 N/A

1 Source: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder, 2005-2007, 2006-2008, 2007-2009, 2008-2010, 2009-2011, and 2010-2012 American Community Survey (ACS) 3-Year Estimates.  Data were retrieved from census (Table GCT2302).  Note: The percent of children under 6 years old with all parents in the workforce between 2010-2012.

2 Source: Washington State Association for Head Start and ECEAP (Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program) 2013/2014.  Note: ECEAP (Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program): Comprehensive preschool programs that provide free services and support to eligible children and their families. The goal is to help ensure all Washington children enter kindergarten ready to succeed. The programs include:  early learning preschool; family support and parent involvement; child health coordination and nutrition.  ECEAP is a state-funded preschool and accepts families at or below 110% of the Federal Poverty Level.

3 Source: Washington State Association for Head Start and ECEAP (Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program) 2013/2014.  Statewide total for Early Head Start, 2012/13.  Note: Head Start: Comprehensive preschool programs that provide free services and support to eligible children and their families. Head Start is federally-funded, with at least 90% of enrolled families who must be at or below 130% of the Federal Poverty Level. Priority is given to families at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level; maximum 35% can be between 100 and 130% of the Federal Poverty Level.

4 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2015.  Note: Licensed Child Care: Centers and family homes granted by Department of Early Learning.  Licensed child care providers follow licensing requirements set by the state to ensure children in are in safe, healthy, and nurturing places. (County numbers do not include Military Child Care Centers, Summer Camps and Exempt Preschool Programs but state numbers do include non-Department of Early Learning-licensed Military and Tribal providers, but not preschool or exempt school-age programs.)

5 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2015  Note: Licensed Child Care: Centers and family homes granted by Department of Early Learning.  Licensed child care providers follow licensing requirements set by the state to ensure children in are in safe, healthy, and nurturing places. (County numbers do not include Military Child Care Centers, Summer Camps and Exempt Preschool Programs but state numbers do include non-Department of Early Learning-licensed Military and Tribal providers, but not preschool or exempt school-age programs.)

6 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2015  Note: Licensed Child Care: Centers and family homes granted by Department of Early Learning.  Licensed child care providers follow licensing requirements set by the state to ensure children in are in safe, healthy, and nurturing places. (County numbers do not include Military Child Care Centers, Summer Camps and Exempt Preschool Programs but state numbers do include non-Department of Early Learning-licensed Military and Tribal providers, but not preschool or exempt school-age programs.)

7 Source: Child Care Aware of NW Washington, July 2015  Note: Licensed Child Care: Centers and family homes granted by Department of Early Learning.  Licensed child care providers follow licensing requirements set by the state to ensure children in are in safe, healthy, and nurturing places. (County numbers do not include Military Child Care Centers, Summer Camps and Exempt Preschool Programs but state numbers do include non-Department of Early Learning-licensed Military and Tribal providers, but not preschool or exempt school-age programs.)

8Source: Northwest Educational Service District, August 2015 Note: The Regional PreK-K Transition Report is a transitional document that shared between community PreK providers and kindergarten teachers, which represents a growing collaboration based on common professional development, shared expectations and aligned instructional approaches. The Transition Form is intended to maintain common understandings and shared practices (alignment) between PreK providers and K teachers established through joint professional development, to provide a means of communicating children’s developmental progress as they leave PreK and enter kindergarten, to help schools meet the needs of incoming students and to grow the number of PreK and K teachers working in collaboration.

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
 K-12 enrollment, public schools 1 7,930 1,925 18,832 108,807 26,177 1,061,056
Number of school districts 2 3 4 7 14 7 286
Number of elementary schools 3 7 5 25 107 31 35,641
Number of elementary schools particpating in WaKIDS 2014 4 1 3 19 41 24 623
Kindergarten enrollment, public schools  5 603 144 1,465 7,892 1,940 81,206
Districts that submitted kindergarten entry data (WaKIDS) Fall 2014 6 1 2 5 10 5 193
Free & Reduced Lunch enrollment 7 38% 45% 52% 38% 41% 45%
Transitional Bilingual – English Language Learners 8 204 93 2,690 10,350 1,775 102,339
3rd graders meeting or exceeding MSP/WASL math standards  9 64% 73% 60% 67% 64% 65%
3rd graders meeting or exceeding MSP/WASL readingstandards 10 75% 84% 70% 75% 76% 73%
Students from low-income households who graduated high school in four years  11 72% 77% 60% 67% 63% 66%
 # of districts in the region that accepted Regional PreK-K Transition Reports  12 3 3 5 11 7 N/A
School Ready Source: Northwest Educational Service District 189, August 2015

1 Source: OSPI, 2014-15

2 Source: OSPI, 2014-15

3 Source: OSPI, 2014-15

4 Source: NWESD. Data retrieved from Teaching Strategies Gold for Fall 2014

5 Source: OSPI, 2014-15

6 Source: NWESD.  Data retrieved from Teaching Strategies Gold for Fall 2014  Note: The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K-12 experience. WaKIDS has three components: Family Connection welcomes families into the K-12 system as partners in their child’s education, Whole-Child Assessment gives kindergarten teachers information about the social and emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development of the children in their classrooms and Early Learning Collaboration, which aligns practices of early learning professionals and kindergarten teachers to support smooth transitions for children.  Data Source: Numbers of WaKIDS participant districts are based on preliminary information from the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and includes those that voluntarily adopted into the program early (before they are required by the state).

7 Source: 2013 data from Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) Child Nutrition Services. The sources of this data are the annual October headcounts April 22, 2014. Note: The number and percent of students enrolled in public K-12 schools who applied for free or reduced price meals at their school. Data reflect only those enrolled students who applied as of October 1 of each year. These includes the number of students who applied and were eligible for free or reduced priced meals. These numbers do not necessarily reflect use of the service. The federal income eligibility guidelines are 135% FPL (poverty guide) for free school meals, and 185% FPL for reduced price school meals. These guidelines are available online.

8 Source: OSPI, 2014-2015 Note: A student is considered eligible for the Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program if they meet the following two conditions:  1) the language used most often used by student in his/her place of residence (not necessarily by parents, guardians, or others) or the first language that the student learned, and 2) English skills are sufficiently lacking or absent as to delay learning.

9 Source: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: Data for this measure come from the Washington State Office of Superintendant of Public Instruction (OSPI). Data were retrieved on April 2, 2014 from the datafiles “MSP/HSPE Scores by District” and “MSP/HSPE Scores by State”.  Note: The percentage of third graders meeting WASL/MSP reading test standards for the school year. The Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) is a test that reflects student knowledge based on the state’s Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs). The WASL was administered to students in grades 3 through 10 from 1997 to 2009. It was replaced in 2010 by the state’s Measures of Student Progress (MSP) and the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE). More information can be found online.  This was the last year all schools used a common assessment.

10 Source: Annie E Casey Kids Count Data Center: Data for this measure come from the Washington State Office of Superintendant of Public Instruction (OSPI). Data were retrieved on April 2, 2014 from the datafiles “MSP/HSPE Scores by District” and “MSP/HSPE Scores by State”.  Note: The percentage of third graders meeting WASL/MSP math test standards for the school year.  This was the last year all schools used a common assessment.

11 Source: OSPI: Low Income, 2013-2014 School Year 4-Year Adjusted Cohort, Class of 2014

12 Source: Northwest Educational Service District 189, August 2015

Data Indicator Island San Juan Skagit Snohomish Whatcom State
 Housing Affordability Ranking 1 Poor Poor Poor Poor Poor N/A
Job Opportunities Ranking 2 Poor Fair Good Good Fair N/A
Community Resources Ranking 3 Good Good Good Fair Fair N/A
Combined households below US poverty and those that earn over poverty level but less than basic cost of living:
Asian households 4 37% 37% 47% 31% 47% N/A
Black households  5 48% 17% 31% 45% 67% N/A
Hispanic households 6 37% 57% 57% 47% 55% N/A
White households 7 31% 31% 33% 32% 39% N/A
Number of partner organizations affiliated with Northwest Early Learning 8 36 22 33 36 33 10
Participants at PreK-K Collaborative Network Dinner & Dialogues, Spring 2016  9 58 50 36 74 50 N/A
PreK-K Transition Reports shared between preschool and kindergarten teachers 10 178^ 70^ 274^ 926^ 343^ N/A

Pre-K Transition Reports

School Ready

Source: Northwest Educational Service District 189, August 2015

1 Source: Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard Figure 38, pages 88-89; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

2 Source: Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard Figure 38, pages 88-89; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

3 Source: Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard Figure 38, pages 88-89; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

4 Source:  Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard pages 154-155; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

5 Source:  Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard pages 154-155; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

6 Source: Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard pages 154-155; United Way ALICE Report.  Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

7 Source: Fall 2015 Pacific Northwest: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Study of Financial Hardship Economic Viability Dashboard pages 154-155; United Way ALICE Report. Note: ALICE, an acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed, are households that earn more than the U.S. poverty level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county. Combined, the number of poverty and ALICE households equals the total population struggling to afford basic needs.

8 Source:

9 Source: September 2015 PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District

10 Source: September 2015 PreK-K Collaborative Network, Northwest Educational Service District